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Community Outreach and Communications Specialist Position

Job Announcement and Application

PURPOSE: The Community Outreach and Communications Specialist will assist and support regional and national communication activities of the FracTracker Alliance; and engage and support organizations, primarily but not exclusively at the community-scale, fighting fossil fuel harms in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia – especially in the Ohio River corridor.

POSITION DUTIES:

  • Assist with website content development and editing, including blog posts and responding to comments
  • Assist with writing and preparing monthly e-newsletter
  • Develop and post social media content and respond to comments
  • Engage with local and regional organizations involved in fighting oil and gas harms – through email, conference calls, listserves, presentations, and attendance at key meetings
  • Elicit guest blogs from organizations and researchers working in affected communities
  • Author and post personal blogs about key community issues or fights
  • Coordinate with Manager of Data and Technology and/or regional coordinators to create maps and data analyses in support of key community issues or needs
  • Promote FracTracker’s mobile and web applications and provide training – in-person and online – to font line communities and organizations about the use of these technologies
  • Assist in updating and developing digital and printable training tools, guides, and tutorials on various topics of interest to our website visitors and clients
  • Assist in developing user surveys to obtain feedback on the FracTracker web experiences and experiences with other FracTracker tools or activities
  • Assist in engagement of news media on oil and gas issues and FracTracker’s work under direction of the Manager of Communications and Development
  • Assist with grant reporting, as needed
  • Other related-communications and community-support duties, as assigned

POSITION REPORTS TO: Manager of Communications and Development

PREFERRED SKILLS: Writing and editing; website design; media relations; public speaking; citizen science; data management; social media; teamwork; interpersonal; and familiarity with environmental justice issues, and knowledge of environmental and/or public health concerns or other issues of relevance to understanding and addressing the implications of oil and gas extraction and climate change

MINIMUM EDUCATION/QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor’s degree in communications, journalism or related field OR natural or physical sciences, environmental studies, citizen science, social science, public health, public policy or other relevant field; three years of experience exercising the skills listed above; additional academic studies (e.g. graduate coursework or research) can substitute for work experience; ability and willingness to travel (~10% of time); valid U.S. driver’s license.

LOCATION: Pittsburgh, PA                    STATUS: Full time (37.5 hours per week) – exempt

COMPENSATION/BENEFITS: Starting salary of $45,000 – $50,000 annually (based on experience), generous healthcare benefits (medical, dental, vision), paid sick leave, 15 vacation days per year, matching 401k program

Interested candidates should apply online using the form below by July 6, 2018 at 5:00pm ET.

The deadline to apply for this position has passed.


The FracTracker Alliance studies, maps, and communicates the risks of oil and gas development to protect our planet and support renewable energy transformation. Learn more at www.FracTracker.org

The FracTracker Alliance is an equal opportunity employer. All decisions regarding recruiting, hiring, promotion, assignment, training, termination, and other terms and conditions of employment are made without unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, religion, age, pregnancy, disability, work-related injury, covered veteran status, political ideology, genetic information, marital status, or any other factor that the law protects from employment discrimination.

Earth week in WI Feature Image

Earth Week in Wisconsin

By Brook Lenker, Executive Director, FracTracker Alliance

Frac sand mining is a growing threat to the agricultural landscapes of the upper Midwest and a health risk to those who live near the mines. With a general slowdown in the oil and gas industry, sand mining may seem a lessening concern in the universe of extraction impacts, but a recent visit to Wisconsin during Earth Week suggested otherwise.

Frac Sand Mining Presentations

Dr. Auch presenting in Wisconsin on frac sand mining issues

Dr. Auch presenting in Wisconsin on frac sand mining issues

I joined my colleague, Dr. Ted Auch, on an informative cross-state tour that started in Milwaukee. We were presenters at the Great Lakes Water Conservation Conference where representatives from breweries around the region and across the country came together to discuss their most precious commodity: clean and abundant water. Extraction affects both the quantity and quality of water – and our insights opened many eyes. Businesses like microbreweries with a focus on sustainability and a strong environmental ethic recognize the urgency and benefit of the renewable energy transformation.

From Milwaukee, we headed west to Madison and the University of Wisconsin where Caitlin Williamson of the Wisconsin Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology organized the first of two forums entitled “Sifting the Future: The Ecological, Agricultural, and Health Effects of Frac Sand Mining in Wisconsin.” We were joined by Kimberlee Wright of Midwest Environmental Advocates to address an engaged audience of 35 people from the campus and greater community. Thanks to Wisconsin Eye, a public affairs network, the entire program was videotaped.

Brook Lenker presenting at Sifting the Future event in Wisconsin

Brook Lenker presenting at Sifting the Future event in Wisconsin

A long drive to Eau Claire revealed rolling farmland, wooded hills, and prodigious wetlands home to waterfowl and the largest cranberry industry in the nation. At the Plaza Hotel, we met Cheryl Miller of the Save the Hills Alliance, the grantor enabling us to study the regional footprint of sand mining, and Pat Popple, advocate extraordinaire and our host for the second “Sifting the Future” event. The good folks at Public Lab were also in town to facilitate citizen monitoring of silica dust from the mining process, including a free workshop and training that weekend.

The evening program attracted 50 people from as far away as Iowa and Minnesota. Their interest in and knowledge of sand mining issues was impressive, and many were heavily involved in fighting local mines. Dr. Crispin Pierce spoke of his research about airborne particulates around frac sand operations, complementing both FracTracker presentations – mine emphasizing the broad array of environmental and public health perils related to oil and gas extraction and Ted’s examining the scale and scope of sand mining, demand for proppant, and the toll of the industry on agricultural productivity, forests and the carbon cycle.

Mining Photos

During the five day trip, sand mines were visited and documented, their incongruent and expanding presence marring the countryside. Some of them can be seen in this photo gallery:

View all frac sand mining photos >

Other Sights

On Earth Day, while driving east to return to Milwaukee, Sandhill cranes, a timeless symbol of the Wisconsin wild, poked the rich prairie soils searching for food. Joined by Autumn Sabo, a botanist and researcher who assisted our Wisconsin work, we detoured to the nearby Aldo Leopold Center visiting the simple shack that inspired Mr. Leopold to write Sand County Almanac. Considering the reason for my travel, the irony was thick. Ecological consciousness has come a long way, but more evangelism is sorely needed.

Aldo Leopold Center, WI

Aldo Leopold Center, Wisconsin